C. M. Kosemen

Imagine a knock at your motel room door at the dead of the night. The Visitor is standing there to take you, accompanied by a buzzing noise like a million metallic bees.
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Imagine a knock at your motel room door at the dead of the night. The Visitor is standing there to take you, accompanied by a buzzing noise like a million metallic bees.

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For All Yesterdays, John Conway had illustrated a vulture reconstructed with a bat-like flying membrane instead of feathers. Here, I take the opposite stance by whimsically dressing out a pterosaur with bird-like feathers instead of wing membranes. Perhaps future palaeontologists may make the same mistake.
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For All Yesterdays, John Conway had illustrated a vulture reconstructed with a bat-like flying membrane instead of feathers. Here, I take the opposite stance by whimsically dressing out a pterosaur with bird-like feathers instead of wing membranes. Perhaps future palaeontologists may make the same mistake.

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Conventional wisdom has it that all non-bird dinosaurs got extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period. But what if some had held on for a few more million years? Here, a Palaeocene mammal named Pantolambda encounters a late-surviving descendant of Velociraptor or Deinonychus-like dinosaurs.
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Conventional wisdom has it that all non-bird dinosaurs got extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period. But what if some had held on for a few more million years? Here, a Palaeocene mammal named Pantolambda encounters a late-surviving descendant of Velociraptor or Deinonychus-like dinosaurs.

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Various species of Ceratosaurus in scale with a human being. From the right to left, C. dentisculatus, C. nasicornis, C. magnicornis, juvenile specimen.
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Various species of Ceratosaurus in scale with a human being. From the right to left, C. dentisculatus, C. nasicornis, C. magnicornis, juvenile specimen.

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The newly-discovered polar dinosaur Nanuqsaurus, from fossil deposits in Alaska, seen here in scale with a modern-day Inuit girl. Nanuqsaurus was a small-sized relative of the famous Tyrannosaurus rex.
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The newly-discovered polar dinosaur Nanuqsaurus, from fossil deposits in Alaska, seen here in scale with a modern-day Inuit girl. Nanuqsaurus was a small-sized relative of the famous Tyrannosaurus rex.

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The recently discovered Torvosaurus gurneyi, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs known from Europe, in scale with Torvosaurus tanneri, its American relative, and a present-day girl.
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The recently discovered Torvosaurus gurneyi, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs known from Europe, in scale with Torvosaurus tanneri, its American relative, and a present-day girl.

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"Massospondylus and the Ruins of the Effulgent Ones"An early plant-eating dinosaur walks through the silent monuments of The Ones Before The Ones Before Men.
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"Massospondylus and the Ruins of the Effulgent Ones"
An early plant-eating dinosaur walks through the silent monuments of The Ones Before The Ones Before Men.

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The giant meat-eating dinosaur, Giganotosaurus, here restored with a big throat sac. This animal had tiny arms that terminated in hook-like claws. Perhaps it used them to manipulate food items, like mouthparts.
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The giant meat-eating dinosaur, Giganotosaurus, here restored with a big throat sac. This animal had tiny arms that terminated in hook-like claws. Perhaps it used them to manipulate food items, like mouthparts.

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A never-seen-before illustration from All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish. Yes, these are “shrink-wrap” reconstructions of birds again. A pelican and a shoebill stork as interpreted by clueless future palaeontologists.
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A never-seen-before illustration from All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish. Yes, these are “shrink-wrap” reconstructions of birds again. A pelican and a shoebill stork as interpreted by clueless future palaeontologists.

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Scythe-armed swans, as imagined by clueless palaeontologists millions of years in the future. From All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish.
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Scythe-armed swans, as imagined by clueless palaeontologists millions of years in the future. From All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish.

But a print of this work at Zazzle.com

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At one time, pterosaurs were imagined to be flying marsupials, since cold-blooded reptiles could not conceivably evolve into flying forms. What if this was indeed the case?
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At one time, pterosaurs were imagined to be flying marsupials, since cold-blooded reptiles could not conceivably evolve into flying forms. What if this was indeed the case?

www.cmkosemen.com